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Make the First Five Count

Helping children with disabilities reach their full potential

 
 

Every year, millions of young children with unidentified disabilities enter school with learning and health issues that put them far behind their peers and have a lasting, negative effect on their ability to meet their full potential.

When kids get the right treatment and therapy they need before the age of five, they are ready to learn alongside their peers, build lifelong skills and achieve their dreams.

Young children with special needs and developmental delays can succeed in school alongside their peers if they receive early intervention services – therapies that work to strengthen their physical, social, emotional and intellectual abilities at a very young age.

As the largest provider of early intervention services, Easter Seals staff, therapists and families know what’s possible when kids get the support they need during the first few years of life and what happens when they don’t. But as a nation, we don’t invest nearly enough in early detection and treatment for young children before the age of five, even though it’s incredibly effective and more than pays for itself.

That’s why Easter Seals launched Make the First Five Count. It’s designed to give children at risk of developmental delays or disabilities the right support they need to be school-ready and build a foundation for a lifetime of learning.

Download the Arizona State of Early Intervention Report (PDF)

If you believe all kids deserve to start school, ready and able to learn alongside their peers, join us at MaketheFirstFiveCount.org and speak out today.


As the Easter Seals affiliate for central and northern Arizona,
Easter Seals Southwest Human Development is proud to be part of
the Make the First Five Count campaign.

Questions? Birth to Five HELPINE: 1-877-705-KIDS (5437) Place a callback request.

Approximately one out of every six children in the U.S. faces a developmental disability or a disabling behavioral problem before the age of 18. Yet fewer than 50% of these children are identified before they start school.

 
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